Polycarbonate

Please post all questions and answers in here. This way people can easily see if someone else has the same problem.

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nate200789
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Post by nate200789 »

I meant " Is it thick enough so that when I bend it, it will keep it's shape"
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razerdave
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Post by razerdave »

When bending polycarb, it has to be a sharp bend and not a gradual curve, otherwise it doesn't stay in that shape. Stewie has both ends of his shell bolted to the base to keep that curve, and it goes flat again when I unscrew it

muchalucha
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Post by muchalucha »

My advice would be to put the polycarb in a tub of very hot water for about a minute and then fish it out and bend it to the shape required and run it under cold water it works great.

For a very cool efect add a few drops of food colouring to the water and let the polycarb sit for about 15 minutes and it really soaks up the colour tinting it whatever colour you want. Sorry this ended up sounding like a cooking program.
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Critters
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Post by Critters »

We got a building center based here. Not in the UK though. Im pretter sure they have policarb and lexan. Im not sure and Im just putting it out there

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Simon M
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1mm clear plasticard

Post by Simon M »

I've just bought 1mm clear plasticard this as the 2mm polycarb I've got is too heavy for what I need.



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muchalucha
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Post by muchalucha »

try not to post in threads that are that old , its called thread bumping , everyone (including me) has done it , but it is quite annoying for the mods. in future its better to start a new thread :)
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peterwaller
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Post by peterwaller »

Actually it seems to me to be much more sensible to add to an existing thread if it is on the correct subject even if it is old rather than generating a new one.

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Simon Windisch
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Post by Simon Windisch »

It doesn't annoy me at all :)

Simon

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Simon M
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Post by Simon M »

muchalucha wrote:try not to post in threads that are that old , its called thread bumping , everyone (including me) has done it , but it is quite annoying for the mods. in future its better to start a new thread :)
It seemed the most appropriate place to put it and on a training forum that I own it's in our rules as it keep info all together without there being too many post about the same subject. Plus, not everyone will have seen the earlier posts if they, like me, have just joined.

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peterwaller
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Post by peterwaller »

Definition of thread bumping from Wikipedia is:
To bump a thread on an Internet forum is to post a reply to it purely in order to raise the thread's profile.
Not adding to an existing thread that may be a little out of date.

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